Nature

Managable Wistarias

By Alfred Turner

Making It Grow Minute

Credit SC Public Radio Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. The world, or rather the United States, would be a better place if we could get rid of all the Asian wisterias that have gone rogue and are taking over woodlands and abandoned and yards and houses (I’ve seen it growing into an attic when a window pane was gone).

Why Does the Turtle Cross the Road?

By Olivia Aldridge

It's common for female turtles to cross roadways during the spring and summer months while searching for nesting grounds.

Now that summer is approaching, it’s a common occurrence to see turtles crawling across roadways in South Carolina (and many other states). Ever wondered why that is? In honor of World Turtle Day, I spoke with Cris Hagen, Director of Animal Management at the Turtle Survival Center, a program of the Turtle Survival Alliance, in Charleston.

The National Park Service's Exotic Plants Management Teams

By Amanda McNulty

Making It Grow Minute

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. The National Park Service staff wear a variety of hats. One responsibility that we might not think of is keeping invasive species at bay in what are described as some of the most iconic and ecologically important areas of the country. The Exotic Plant Management Teams were created to meet this challenge. Among the plants they must battle are Asian wistarias which overtake trees and shrubs in many locales. Here is their description of the damage they’ve observed.

The Dwarf Crested Iris

By Alfred Turner

Making It Grow Minute

Credit SC Public Radio Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow.

The Tulip Tree

By Rudy Mancke

A Tulip Tree in flower.

One common name for this tree is "Tulip Poplar." However, it is not in the poplar family, but in the magnolia.

It's Bird Migration Time

By Rudy Mancke

A Summer Tanager.

Whether passing through or nesting here for the summer, there are lots of species returning to South Carolina right now.

 

The South Carolina Aquarium Sea Turtle Care Center

By Sean Flynn

Sea Turtle

When a sea turtle is found stranded or injured, SCDNR brings the animal to the Sea Turtle Care Center for treatment. Sea turtles arrive most commonly suffering from debilitated turtle syndrome, shock from being exposed to cold temperatures, or injury from a boat strike or shark bite. Their staff veterinarians diagnose each turtle and work with Care Center staff and volunteers to provide treatments and rehabilitative care. Patients are given IV fluids, antibiotics, vitamins and other medications.

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