Pickens

The Outdoor Dream Foundation

By Amanda McNulty

Making It Grow Minute

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. While reading the Department of Natural Resource’s award-winning magazine, South Carolina Wildlife, I learned about a remarkable organization that DNR partners with.

Poinsettias

By Sean Flynn

Poinsettias

Clemson professor and poinsettia expert Dr. Jim Faust joins us at "Making It Grow" and shares tips on selecting and caring for poinsettias, as well as a little history about the plant and how it came to America. Dr. Faust also brought some new varieties and historical varieties to show.

Tilia Americana

By Amanda McNulty

Making It Grow Minute

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. The genus Tilia sometimes has lots of species associated with it, but the AC Moore Herbarium’s SC Plant Atlas lists just one in South Carolina, Tilia americana with several subspecies following it. This tree is the only member of the Malvacea family in North America, and notes I found said that the buds are edible but mucilaginous – okra famously for its slimy potential is also in that family.

Pecans

By Sean Flynn

pecan pie

Clemson Extension Food Safety and Nutrition Agent Rhonda Matthews joins us at "Making It Grow" and gives advice on storing and using pecans!

Arrowwood Viburnum Is a Hearty Native Plant That Pollinators Love

By Amanda McNulty

Making It Grow Minute

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Davis Sander of South Pleasantburg Nursery came to the show recently with a collection of viburnums. One in particular caught my eye as it has great value for wildlife, especially pollinators and birds. Viburnum dentatum, arrowwood viburnum, gets its common name according to Michael Dirr because the very strong root shoots, this plant can sucker and spread, were used for the shafts of arrows by native Americans.

Early Bloomers for Pollinators

By Amanda McNulty

Making It Grow Minute

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Although fifty-five degrees feels pretty chilly to me, that’s the magic temperature as spring nears when some native bees and the European honeybees are out foraging for food – and a time when not many plants are in flower. So if you want to attract and support pollinators it’s important for you to install some very early-blooming plants in your yard. We’ve talked about the earliest of the spring bloomers, red maple, Acer rubrum, which also is a larval food host for the Rosy Maple Moth.

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