Music

Barbara Cook on Piano Jazz

By Alfred Turner

Barbara Cook at the 120th Anniversary of Carnegie Hall gala, MOMA, New York City. (April 12th 2011)

This week Piano Jazz remembers Barbara Cook (1927 – August 8, 2017), the Tony and Grammy Award-winning lyric soprano who was a favorite of audiences around the world. She was a star on Broadway as an ingénue and became a staple of the New York cabaret scene in the later years of her prolific career. She was McPartland’s guest in 1998.

Bluegrass Music is a South Carolina Tradition

By Tut Underwood

The mandolin is a central of many Bluegrass groups.

Bluegrass music has always been popular in South Carolina, but Willie Wells thinks it’s about to break out to a new, mass popularity.  Every Friday night, Wells holds a bluegrass jam at his store, Bill’s Music Shop and Pickin’ Parlor.  Fans and musicians enjoy a performance before getting out their guitars, banjos and fiddles to play country, gospel and bluegrass tunes with each other. 

The Organs of L’Organo

By Aimee Crouch

pipe organ

Since 1979, the Piccolo Spoleto Festival held in Charleston has featured a series of pipe organ recitals each day for two weeks beginning on Memorial Day weekend. This year, there are 12 recitals featuring seasoned professionals and gifted young organists from across the U.S.  David Kiser, host of S.C. Public Radio's "On the Keys" and producer of "Pipe Organs of S.C." gives us a sampling of instruments heard in the series that are housed in some of Charleston’s most historic churches.

SC Native Josh Turner Talks About the Importance of Reading

By Tabitha Safdi

Josh Turner

Josh Turner, country music star and South Carolina native, talks about the importance of reading.

Tune in to SCETV's Palmetto Scene on May 17th at 7:30 to hear more South Carolina celebrities talk about their favorite books!

And don't forget to catch PBS's Great American Read all summer long! 

Violinist Brings Sound of Seventeenth-Century Stradivarius to Charleston

By Bradley Fuller

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When the celebrated maker of string instruments Antonio Stradivari put the finishing touches on the violin now known as the Ex-Nachez, Bach and Handel were barely into their toddler years and the invention of the piano was still more than a decade away. 

The rare violin has passed through the hands of many an owner and virtuoso performer since that time, but, as Yuriy Bekker of the Charleston Symphony Orchestra can attest, the instrument is still in excellent playing condition.

Narrative: "It Was Like We Hit Lightning in a Bottle"

By Laura Hunsberger

Hippie Torrales in his early days as a DJ in New Jersey.

This edition of Narrative features an interview with Columbia resident Hippie Torrales, who came of age in New Jersey with the dream of becoming a professional DJ. By age 20 he was mainstay of the New Jersey club scene, opening one of the biggest clubs of the era, Zanzibar. Here, Hippie explains how he and his contemporaries became the innovators of a new musical style in the 1980s.

Gil Goldstein on Piano Jazz

By Laura Hunsberger

Gil Goldstein

Composer and arranger Gil Goldstein came to the piano by way of the accordion, which he has rediscovered and added to the jazz lexicon. Collaborations with Jaco Pistorius and Bill Evans fostered his career and led to work with David Sanborn, Michael Franks, and Al Jarreau, among others, and to writing original scores for films. In this 2001 Piano Jazz session, Goldstein solos on his own “City Lights.” McPartland accompanies him as he plays accordion for a few tunes, including “Waltz for Debbie.”

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