Arts & Culture

South Carolina's Important Role in African American History

By P.A. Bennett

African-American History

February is African American history month. Some may ask “Why celebrate African American history...isn’t that American history?” Absolutely, but unfortunately, for hundreds of years, much of the history related to those of African descent was either totally ignored or misrepresented. South Carolina plays a major role in this more inclusive look at American history; because for many people of African descent in the United States today, Sullivan’s Island, S.C. is where their “American” history began.

Postcard From the Past Mobilizes a Columbia Historic Church to Restoration

By K. Park and T. Safdi

Ebenezer Lutheran Church

“We’re excited to be a part of history today,” said Jane George Holmes.

Holmes is a member of Ebenezer Lutheran Church, which saw an exciting addition of two new cupolas to its storied chapel on Monday, February 6. Construction crews readied cranes to hoist the cupolas into the Columbia skyline, as members of the community and the congregation gathered to watch from the sidewalks below. The group broke into a joyous rendering of the hymn, “Lift High the Cross,” as the cupolas, topped with white crosses, were gently placed atop the chapel's columns.

The Early History of Hobcaw

By R. Dymock

Leland Ferguson

Hobcaw Barony, known to Native Americans as “Between the Waters,” has a rich past. Although Hobcaw is best known for the Baruch family and their many wealthy and well-known visitors,  the 20th century is only a small part of Hobcaw’s story.  For most of its history, the majority of people here were Native Americans, Africans and African Americans. Leland Ferguson, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology professor at the University of South Carolina, discusses the impact this early history had, and still has today, on the land between the waters.
 
 

SC's Highest Point, Sassafras Mountain

By T. Safdi

Sassafras Mountain

As the highest point in South Carolina, Sassafras Mountain boosts tremendous views of three neighboring states: Tennessee, North Carolina and Georgia. It is also part of the Appalachian Mountains.

The Waccamaw Indian People

By B. Newman

Buster Hatcher, Chief of the Waccamaw Indian People,

The Native American presence at Hobcaw Barony is apparent in the property’s very name, said to be a Native American word meaning “between the waters.” Physical evidence is readily seen in the shell middens that line the shores of Hobcaw’s creeks and emerge as outcroppings in the marshes. Many other material remains have been found at Hobcaw in the form of pottery sherds, blades, points, and numerous other artifacts, yet much archaeological work remains to be done here. 

SC's Oldest Public Building, The Powder Magazine

By T. Safdi

The Powder Magazine

The Powder Magazine, originally a military storage area for loose gun powder, is located in Charleston, SC. It is a National Historic Landmark and South Carolina's oldest public building. Today, The Powder Magazine is an educational historic site that welcomes visitors daily.

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