Women in SC

Ann Pamela Cunningham

Ann Pamela Cunningham

Ann Pamela Cunningham (1816-1868) was a South Carolinian from Laurens County who led the effort to restore and preserve Mount Vernon, George Washington’s ancestral home in Virginia.  She served as First Regent of the Mount Vernon Ladies’ Association of the Union.

Eliza Lucas Pinckney

Eliza Lucas Pinckney

Short biography of indigo planter and colonial entrepreneur Eliza Lucas Pinckney, another example of the enormous contribution the Pinckney family of South Carolina has made to the history of our state.

Septima Clark

Septima Clark

A pioneer in grassroots citizenship education, Septima Clark was called the ‘‘Mother of the Civil Rights Movement’’ by Martin Luther King. Clark was born in Charleston, South Carolina in 1898, daughter of a laundrywoman and a former slave. She became a teacher on Johns Island, leader of workshops at Highlander Folk School in Tennessee, and founder of “citizenship schools” throughout the South. Septima Clark, civil rights activist, developed the concept of “citizenship schools.”

Mary Boykin Chestnut

Mary Boykin Chestnut

5-minute biography of the life of American Civil War era diarist Mary Chestnut. Through the use of available archival materials, scholar interviews, and historical illustrations this program details the events surrounding Chestnut’s life and her contributions to South Carolina and American history.

Frances Ravenel Smythe Edmunds

Frances Ravenel Smythe Edmunds

Frances Ravenel Smythe Edmunds achieved national recognition as an advocate for historic preservation. She graduated from the College of Charleston in 1939. In 1947, she founded the Historic Charleston Foundation and served as Director. In 1971, she received  the Louise DuPont Crowninshield Award. President Carter appointed her to the National Advisory Council on Historic Preservation.

Marian Wright Edelman

Marian Wright Edelman

Marian Wright Edelman is founder and President of the Children's Defense Fund, the nation’s strongest advocacy group for children and families. Born in 1939 in Bennettsville, South Carolina, she attended Spelman College and Yale Law School. In the sixties, she was active in the civil rights movement in Mississippi and worked with Martin Luther King  and Robert Kennedy to assist poor people.

Susan Pringle Frost

Photograph of Susan Pringle Frost

Susan Pringle Frost dedicated her life to making sure that Charleston’s historic architectural beauty would be preserved.  Born in Charleston to wealthy parents in 1873, she lived in the Miles Brewton House on King Street.  When her family’s fortune dwindled, Frost got a job as a stenographer.  Working for architect Bradford Lee Gilbert, she discovered she had a taste for historic architecture.  Later as a U.S. District Court stenographer, she became interested in the women’s suffrage movement.

Darla Moore

Photograph of Darla Moore

Darla Moore was born and raised near Lake City, South Carolina, growing up on the family cotton, soybean and tobacco farm.  After graduating from Lake City High School, she attended the University of South Carolina to study political science, later working for the Republican National Committee in Washington.  In 1982, Moore gained her MBA from George Washington University and moved to New York City where she became become one of the most successful and highest paid women in the banking industry.  She was the first woman featured on the cover of Fortune Magazine, and was listed as one of For

Maude Callen

By J. Johnson

Maude Callen

This episode is about Maude Callen (1898 -- 1990), a Nurse-Midwife, who singlehandedly brought health care to rural Pineville, S.C. and the surrounding area of Berkeley County in the early 1920s, continuing to the 1970s. The episode will tell how she delivered some 800 babies, and trained some 400 women as midwives in depressing, treacherous conditions. Many share their memories of Maude Callen and the invaluable medical service she provided as nurse and doctor to thousands in this low income area of South Carolina for generations.

Mary McLeod Bethune

By J. Johnson

Mary McLeod Bethune

This profile will show how Mary Jane McLeod Bethune, born to poor cotton farmers in Mayesville, SC, would brilliantly start a school of her own with just $1.50, which became an internationally recognized university. Dr. Bethune influenced important African-American Political leaders of the day, created a “Black Cabinet”, and was an advisor to several U.S. Presidents, among them, President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

The profile will also feature interviews with:

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