SC History

Eliza Lucas Pinckney

Eliza Lucas Pinckney

Short biography of indigo planter and colonial entrepreneur Eliza Lucas Pinckney, another example of the enormous contribution the Pinckney family of South Carolina has made to the history of our state.

Septima Clark

Septima Clark

A pioneer in grassroots citizenship education, Septima Clark was called the ‘‘Mother of the Civil Rights Movement’’ by Martin Luther King. Clark was born in Charleston, South Carolina in 1898, daughter of a laundrywoman and a former slave. She became a teacher on Johns Island, leader of workshops at Highlander Folk School in Tennessee, and founder of “citizenship schools” throughout the South. Septima Clark, civil rights activist, developed the concept of “citizenship schools.”

Mary Boykin Chestnut

Mary Boykin Chestnut

5-minute biography of the life of American Civil War era diarist Mary Chestnut. Through the use of available archival materials, scholar interviews, and historical illustrations this program details the events surrounding Chestnut’s life and her contributions to South Carolina and American history.

Frances Ravenel Smythe Edmunds

Frances Ravenel Smythe Edmunds

Frances Ravenel Smythe Edmunds achieved national recognition as an advocate for historic preservation. She graduated from the College of Charleston in 1939. In 1947, she founded the Historic Charleston Foundation and served as Director. In 1971, she received  the Louise DuPont Crowninshield Award. President Carter appointed her to the National Advisory Council on Historic Preservation.

Maj. Gen. Charles F. Bolden, Jr.

Maj. Gen. Charles F. Bolden, Jr.

Inducted into the South Carolina Hall Of Fame, Charles Bolden, Jr. flew on four historic Space Shuttle missions in the 1980's and 90's, and became the first African-American to lead NASA as NASA Administrator.

Segregated Marine Says, "You can't get enough education"

By K. Cannon

B.S Plair at Hermon Presbyterian Church in Rock Hill, SC.

B.S. Plair of Rock Hill, South Carolina, served for the Montford Point Marines in 1945, until he was honorably discharged in 1946. The Montford Point Marines were based in Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, and were the first African American Marines to serve in the military, following an executive order from President Franklin Roosevelt in 1941 that required the armed services to recruit and enlist African Americans.

Ronald Erwin McNair

Ronald Erwin McNair

Inducted into the South Carolina Hall Of Fame, Ronald McNair was the second African-American to go into space, and was part of the STS-51L crew that died when the Space Shuttle Challenger exploded shortly after lift-off in 1986.

Living History at Historic Brattonsville

By K. Cannon

Visitor Center sign at Historic Brattonsville in York County, SC

Historic Brattonsville is a 775-acre Revolutionary War site located in York County, South Carolina. It is the site of the Bratton Plantation, which was owned by the Bratton family. The Bratton family came to North America in the early 18th century and ended up settling in present-day York County in 1766. The Historic Brattonsville site now consists of original buildings as well as reconstructed buildings, which were made and decorated to reflect the historical influences of the time.

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