SC History

New SC Film “Charlie’s Place” Premieres April 26 on SCETV

April 22, 2018 - Posted in SCETV by Glenn Rawls
The staff of Charlie's Place.

Charlie’s Place , a new South Carolina ETV documentary, tells the story of an African-American nightclub owned by Charlie and Sarah Fitzgerald in Myrtle Beach, S.C. from the 1930s to the 1960s. Charlie’s Place on Carver Street was a significant stop for musicians on the...

Daring, WWII "Doolittle Raid" Began in Columbia

April 9, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Tut Underwood
USS HORNET of an Army B-25 on its way to take part in first U.S. air raid on Japan. Doolittle Raid, April 1942.

76 years ago (April 18 1942) 80 brave men did what had never been attempted: they flew army bombers off a U.S. aircraft carrier on their way to bomb Tokyo. The attack, which has become known to history as the Doolittle Raid, was America’s first strike back at Japan after...

"R" is for Russell’s Magazine (1857-1860)

April 6, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio “R” is for Russell’s Magazine (1857-1860). Russell’s Magazine was the last of the southern antebellum literary magazines and arguably the best. It was the magazine for the professional middle class—doctors, lawyers, and college faculty. Paul Hamilton...

William Gilmore Simms

April 5, 2018 - Posted in SC Hall of Fame
Antebellum south graphic with soldiers looking on at a woman.

William Gilmore Simms was born in Charleston, South Carolina. He was a poet, novelist, and historian whose work was a major force in antebellum Southern literature. He was called one of America’s best novelists by Edgar Allen Poe. Works include Martin Faber, Guy Rivers, The...

"P" is for Port Royal, Battle of (November 7, 1861)

April 5, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio “P” is for Port Royal, Battle of (November 7, 1861). On November 7th a Union naval squadron including seventeen warships and thirty-five transports (with 1,300 soldiers aboard) entered Port Royal Sound. The warships bombarded Fort Walker on Hilton...

50 Years Later, Congressman Clyburn Reflects on King’s Visits to South Carolina

April 4, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Thelisha Eaddy
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., speaking in Kingstree, SC, May 8, 1966.

On July 30, 1967 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was in South Carolina. He had tea at Septima Clark’s house in Charleston and later that day spoke at a meeting at the old county hall building on King Street. It would be his last visit to the Palmetto state. Nine months later,...

"P" is for Port Royal

April 4, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio "P" is for Port Royal (Beaufort County; population 3,950). In 1869 Stephen Caldwell Miller began construction of the Port Royal Railroad between Augusta, Georgia, and Battery Point on the southern end of Port Royal Island. The town, railroad, and...

"M' is for Mill Schools

April 3, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

“M” is for Mill Schools. Textile mill executives surrounded their mills with villages and most provided schools to educate the children of mill workers. The mill school was a reflection of the individual community and run with little interference or oversight by the state...

Historic Hangar Gets New Life

April 2, 2018 - Posted in Palmetto Scene by Lynn Cornfoot
Curtiss Wright hangar

When it comes to preserving a building on the National Register of Historic Places, time, money and effort are always part of the challenge. If restoration is possible, then history can teach, inspire and help to revitalize a local community.

"M" is for Militia

April 2, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio “M” is for Militia. South Carolina’s early settlers brought with them the traditional English concept of a militia, the idea that every citizen had a duty to assist in the defense of the community. A 1671 ordinance required all men (sixteen to sixty)...

"M" is for Military Education

March 30, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

“M” is for Military Education. Since the antebellum period, southerners have regarded military education as an excellent way to instill self-discipline, integrity, patriotism, moral virtue, and a sense of civic duty in youths, particularly young men. The South Carolina...

"L" is for Lynch, Thomas, Jr. (1749-1779)

March 29, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio “L” is for Lynch, Thomas, Jr. (1749-1779). Signer of the Declaration of Independence. A native of Prince George Winyah Parish, Lynch attended the Indigo Society School. He then travelled to England where he was schooled at Eton and then Caius College...

"L" is for Lynch, Patrick Nelson (1817-1882)

March 28, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Alfred Turner
South Carolina From A to Z

Credit SC Public Radio “L” is for Lynch, Patrick Nelson (1817-1882). Clergyman, diplomat. Lynch was born in Ireland. His family immigrated to South Carolina in 1819 and settled in Cheraw. Bishop John England educated Lynch in his boys’ academy in Charleston and then sent...

An Archaeology of Life in Charleston

March 26, 2018 - Posted in SC Public Radio by Walter Edgar
Trowel at an archaeological dig.

(Originally broadcast 12/01/2017) - In Charleston: An Archaeology of Life in a Coastal Community (2016, University Press of Florida), Martha Zierden, Curator of Historical Archaeology at The Charleston Museum; and, Dr. Betsy Reitz, University of Georgia Athens, weave...

Camp Croft

March 15, 2018 - Posted in SCETV Regionals by William Richardson
Camp Croft

Camp Croft, a WWII Army Infantry Replacement Center located near Spartanburg, SC. Since 2001, this site has served to honor those who worked and trained at Croft from 1940 to 1946 and to memorialize all US military service personnel who have lost their lives in pursuit of...

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