Financial Literacy

PODCAST | Information Technology: It's for Women, Too

By A. Esselman

Tammy Mainwaring, interviewee

Information technology. Science. Engineering. Math. These are all words that come with a certain expectation of masculinity. A female who goes into engineering is rare, and a woman in a top position in IT tends not to stay long. Does this really matter? 

Wells Fargo Visits W.F. Sandel Elementary to Teach Children to Save

By K. Park

children learn about saving in classroom

On May 12, 2016, Wells Fargo Team Members visited W.F. Sandel Elementary in Columbia, S.C., as part of the bank’s Teach Children to Save Campaign.

Teach Children to Save is a national program sponsored by the American Bankers Association (ABA).

Bank volunteers speak with students and teach mini-lessons to help young people develop saving habits early in life. SCETV was with Wells Fargo as they visited second-graders and taught them about the difference between needs and wants, and the value of saving.

Tax Day is Fast Approaching: The Opportunities and Changes You Need to Know

By K. Park

tax forms

With Tax Day, Monday, Apr. 18, the filing deadline for IRS tax returns, growing closer with every moment--even with three extra days to get your taxes in, many may still have some questions regarding filing 2015 taxes.

Carolina Money spoke with Rosemary Wright; a Senior Wealth Planning Strategist with Wells Fargo that covers the Columbia, S.C. area, about some changes and opportunities the average citizen may not be aware of this tax season.

Q&A | Economics and Education: A Conversation with Courtney Epting

By A. Esselman

Courtney Epting

Courtney Epting works with SC Economics, a support system for South Carolina teachers that is partnered with the South Carolina Department of Education. SC Economics provides free professional development opportunities to teachers that help them to build confidence in what they teach, and a deeper understanding of how economics can be used in the classroom. SC Economics also focuses on students in grades K-12, providing games and competitions, which promote interest in economics and provide skills that are useful in life. 

Millennials More Likely to Cohabitate Before Marriage: Crunching the Numbers

By K. Park

Couple buying their new home

Several studies in recent years have found that millennials are more likely than previous generations to live together and even buy a home before marriage. The Pew Research Center finds that while only 22 percent of millennials are married, compared to 29 percent of Generation X-ers in 1997, the percentage of young adults 18-29 living with a partner to whom they are not married has increased from 5.8 percent in 1997 to 9.2 percent in 1997. 

PODCAST | Getting to Know Ron Lieber, Columnist at The New York Times

By A. Esselman

Ron Lieber

Ron Lieber, The New York Times “Your Money” columnist and author of the bestselling book The Opposite of Spoiled, recently visited the Midlands to talk about raising kids who are financially smart.

The event was hosted by the Central Carolina Community Foundation, the Jewish Federation and the Katie & Irwin Kahn Jewish Community Center.

Carolina Money had the opportunity to talk to Lieber about his career, life, and of course, money. Check out our conversation!

Tax Season Tips

By K. Geer

Tax Season

It’s tax season, and while you’re probably pretty excited about getting a tax refund, the IRS is now warning of scams that could take your identity this tax season. The main thing the IRS is warning people to be on the lookout for is fake emails and phone calls that are posing as IRS’s contacts.

Understanding Retirement: Why It’s Never Too Soon to Save

By K. Park

Retirement

Young professionals and those just entering the marketplace are more often than not given the opportunity to begin investing in a retirement plan. Unfortunately, the idea of giving away part of one’s pay to what appears a faraway prospect causes some to opt out of their employer’s retirement plan, but a Wells Fargo Retirement Study has recently found that just a few years can make a significant difference in retirement saving.

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