Between the Waters

Wendy Allen on Hobcaw Research

By B. Newman

Wendy Allen

In 1956 Bernard Baruch signed over all of Hobcaw Barony to his daughter, Belle. Belle died in 1964, leaving Hobcaw "for the purpose of teaching and/or research in forestry, marine biology, and the care and propagation of wild life and flora and fauna in South Carolina." Today the Belle W. Baruch Foundation owns Hobcaw Barony and makes it available to researchers at South Carolina's universities. The University of South Carolina's Belle W.

Food Historian Michael Twitty Discusses Origins of Lowcountry Cuisine

By B. Newman

Michael Twitty

Culinary adaptations transformed traditional African dishes into a unique, new creolized cuisine, influenced by European and Native American traditions, and characteristic of Gullah culture. Foodways of the South Carolina Lowcountry reach back to the region’s earliest African arrivals and have been shaped by the natural and economic resources of the area. Collards, kale and wild dandelion provided substitutes for leafy greens familiar to Africans arriving during the colonial period. Likewise, sweet potatoes, indigenous to the Americas, substituted for the African yam.

Melissa Cooper of Rutgers University Discusses 20th Century Sea Island Trend

By B. Newman

Melissa Cooper

In the early years of the twentieth century, a number of prominent, wealthy Northerners purchased land on the Waccamaw Neck. Bernard Baruch, who bought Hobcaw Barony in 1905 as a winter vacation home and hunting retreat, was the first, followed by the Huntingtons, Vanderbilts and others. The infusion of money brought by these millionaires was a mixed blessing for the local residents, most of whom were African- American. They had experienced a degree of autonomy since emancipation. Now many of them worked to support the lavish lifestyle of the new landowners.

The McClary Family Visits the Strawberry Schoolhouse

By R. Dymock

McClary Family in Strawberry Schoolhouse

Strawberry Schoolhouse was a private school for African–American children who lived at Hobcaw Barony, built for them by Bernard Baruch in 1915. This was a one room schoolhouse with one teacher for grades 1-5. The schoolhouse had no running water or electricity. Children would frequently have to stay home from school to work or care for their siblings.

Joshua Shubrick Visits Friendfield Village

By R. Dymock

Joshua Shubrick at Friendfield Village

Joshua Shubrick was a former resident of Friendfield Village. He split his time between Georgetown, where he cared for his mother, and Hobcaw, where he went to Strawberry School. Shubrick stayed with his grandfather, Timothy McCants in Friendfield while he went to school. He left the area as a young man, but returned in 2004 and became an oral historian for visitors to the now-preserved Friendfield Village.

In this video Shubrick discusses his memories of Friendfield Village as he leads a tour of the house his grandfather stayed in. Mr. Shubrick died in March, 2015.

 

The Early History of Hobcaw

By R. Dymock

Leland Ferguson

Hobcaw Barony, known to Native Americans as “Between the Waters,” has a rich past. Although Hobcaw is best known for the Baruch family and their many wealthy and well-known visitors,  the 20th century is only a small part of Hobcaw’s story.  For most of its history, the majority of people here were Native Americans, Africans and African Americans. Leland Ferguson, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology at the University of South Carolina, discusses the impact this early history had, and still has today, on the land between the waters.
 
 

The Waccamaw Indian People

By B. Newman

Buster Hatcher, Chief of the Waccamaw Indian People,

The Native American presence at Hobcaw Barony is apparent in the property’s very name, said to be a Native American word meaning “between the waters.” Physical evidence is readily seen in the shell middens that line the shores of Hobcaw’s creeks and emerge as outcroppings in the marshes. Many other material remains have been found at Hobcaw in the form of pottery sherds, blades, points, and numerous other artifacts, yet much archaeological work remains to be done here. 

Behind the Scenes with the Between the Waters Project Director

By T. Safdi

Between the Waters Homepage

Between the Waters is a production of South Carolina ETV and is funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities and Humanities South Carolina. The first project about Hobcaw Barony, produced by SCETV, was a television documentary entitled The Baruchs of Hobcaw, which was broadcast in 2012. This hour-long program left the producers with the desire to find a way to explore the complex story of Hobcaw Barony more deeply and interactively.

SCETV’s Between the Waters Project - Now Available!

By B. Newman

Screen shot from Between the Waters website

Between the Waters, www.betweenthewaters.org, is SCETV’s new immersive transmedia website showcasing the culture and history of Hobcaw Barony, a 16,000 acre historic site on the coast of South Carolina. Located between Charleston and Myrtle Beach, Hobcaw is a crossroads representing every era of human history, providing a lens through which many threads of the nation’s story may be examined.