Technology

Behind the Scenes: The Production of 'My Telehealth'

By T. Safdi

Behind the Scenes at GHS

Walking out of the doors of South Carolina ETV, Marina Ziehe and Taylor Crouch carry a combined 40 pounds' worth of equipment. Loading up and settling in for the drive, they arrive at Greenville Health Systems Children’s Hospital, about a two-hour ride from Columbia. There they set up that equipment to interview Dr. Jonathan Markowitz. He specializes in pediatric gastroenterology. It’s all in an effort to elevate public understanding of telehealth in South Carolina.

Collaboration Drives Healthcare Innovation in South Carolina

By M. Ziehe

South Carolina Telehealth Alliance Advisory Council meeting in a conference room

As the healthcare system continues to evolve, collaboration becomes a significant aspect for efficient change. The South Carolina Telehealth Alliance was formed in 2014 to coordinate and facilitate Telehealth efforts across the state. Its mission is to “improve the health of South Carolina's citizens through telehealth.”

To learn about the Alliance visit www.sctelehealth.org

 

Student Athlete uses Telehealth to Meet Nutrition Goals

By T. Crouch

Micah, 11 years old, enjoys sharing his passion for football with his family.

At eleven years old, Micah has been interested in sports for most of his life.

"Ever since he was two years old, I would have to buy him his own helmet and he would walk around with it all the time," said Felicia Maine, Micah's mother.

With practice, games, and growth spurts, Felicia and Micah went to their long time pediatrician, Dr. James Simmons from All Children's Pediatrics, for advice. Maine says, it is not because they were unhealthy, but that they wanted to stay on track and develop good habits, considering Micah's rigorous practice schedule as he gets older.

Comforting Care: Family Uses Telehealth at Home for Baby in Hospice

By T. Crouch

Baby Jed with Dad

Abby and Richard Feistel describe their family through their Christian faith and roots in the south.

“Blessed for sure,” says Richard Feistel, describing his children.

They have three daughters and a son, filling their home with tiny voices, laughter, and sounds of lots of toys. Both youngest children have special needs. And the youngest, Jedidiah "Jed", was not expected to survive birth having a bladder obstruction, small lungs, and a high chance of failed kidneys.

Telepsychiatry Making a Difference in Patient's Life

By M. Ziehe

Brenda smiling and looking at the camera

"She keeps me young, she really does," says the 70-year-old Myrtle Beach resident Michael Purvis.

Purvis is the father of Brenda, a 27 year-old young lady who has Down Syndrome, a genetic condition in which the person is born with an extra chromossome.

"My Life Was Given Back to Me," Says Telestroke Patient

By T. Crouch

"My family is my everything," says stroke survivor Tracy Plush.

Tracy Plush suffered a stroke two days before her fiftieth birthday, leaving her to celebrate in the hospital.  

On her lunch break, as a 9-1-1 dispatcher, her arm went numb and her speech became slurred. She knew she was having a stroke because she remembered reading about stroke symptoms in a pamphlet she found in a doctor’s office.

Veteran Uses Home-Based Telehealth for PTSD Treatment

By T. Crouch

Darling working on his farm in the low country of South Carolina

After serving in the Army with multiple tours abroad, Jon Darling now spends his days on his farm in the Lowcountry of South Carolina. He works with multiple organizations that connect veterans with small farms. He does it for the work, the cause, and the community.

Since his service, connecting with fellow veterans has been vital. Losing some that were close to him has been devastating.

“We kind of walk around like we don’t have problems. The one thing no one really wants to admit is ‘I need to talk to somebody before this gets out of hand,’” says Darling.

Telehealth Offers Unique Simulation Training for Emergency Responders

By T. Crouch

EMS doing simulation training

For emergency medical professionals, training is vital. Every month, EMS professionals are required to train and maintain certifications. The Medical University of South Carolina and the South Carolina Area Health Education Consortium offer a unique simulation training session. Using video conferencing, EMS professionals communicate with on-location facilitators to work through multiple emergency scenarios. This one-of-a-kind set-up challenges the participants' decision making skills and prepares them for true emergencies.

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