Telehealth

After 5 Strokes, 7 year-old Boy is "Out of the Woods”

By M. Ziehe

Jayden playing basketball

Jayden is an active and playful seven year-old boy who lives with his family in Myrtle Beach. At the age of six, Jayden suffered his first of five strokes while coming back from school.

“I was extremely scared, just wanting my son to get better,” his mother Megan Schnall said.

Jayden was quickly taken to Conway Medical Center, a community hospital ten minutes from their house. It was there that the family was introduced to telehealth.

Student Athlete uses Telehealth to Meet Nutrition Goals

By T. Crouch

Micah, 11 years old, enjoys sharing his passion for football with his family.

At eleven years old, Micah has been interested in sports for most of his life.

"Ever since he was two years old, I would have to buy him his own helmet and he would walk around with it all the time," said Felicia Maine, Micah's mother.

With practice, games, and growth spurts, Felicia and Micah went to their long time pediatrician, Dr. James Simmons from All Children's Pediatrics, for advice. Maine says, it is not because they were unhealthy, but that they wanted to stay on track and develop good habits, considering Micah's rigorous practice schedule as he gets older.

Comforting Care: Family Uses Telehealth at Home for Baby in Hospice

By T. Crouch

Baby Jed with Dad

Abby and Richard Feistel describe their family through their Christian faith and roots in the south.

“Blessed for sure,” says Richard Feistel, describing his children.

They have three daughters and a son, filling their home with tiny voices, laughter, and sounds of lots of toys. Both youngest children have special needs. And the youngest, Jedidiah "Jed", was not expected to survive birth having a bladder obstruction, small lungs, and a high chance of failed kidneys.

Telepsychiatry Making a Difference in Patient's Life

By M. Ziehe

Brenda smiling and looking at the camera

"She keeps me young, she really does," says the 70-year-old Myrtle Beach resident Michael Purvis.

Purvis is the father of Brenda, a 27 year-old young lady who has Down Syndrome, a genetic condition in which the person is born with an extra chromossome.

Telehealth Research Aims to Improve Women's Health in Rural South Carolina

By M. Ziehe

Woman walking in a rural area

The Women's Health Research Team was founded in January 2013 at the College of Charleston. This team uses a multi- and interdisciplinary approach to women’s health research, "drawing from the behavioral and clinical science, communication, and social marketing fields." In 2015, the team was asked to conduct telehealth research designed to improve understanding of health care access for women in rural communities.

Distance Education Helps Providers Treat Patients for Hepatitis C

By M. Ziehe

Dr. Ahuja and Caroline Derrick teaching the tele-infectious disease course

Telehealth is not all about seeing a patient on a computer screen to treat his or her condition; the clinical side is just one component of telehealth. An integral component of telehealth is distance education, which refers to situations in which the instructor and learner are geographically separated and rely on electronic devices for instructional delivery. Distance education courses are educating patients, community members and/or healthcare providers on a range of health topics.

"Providers are hungry for knowledge," says Dr. Divya Ahuja.

"My Life Was Given Back to Me," Says Telestroke Patient

By T. Crouch

"My family is my everything," says stroke survivor Tracy Plush.

Tracy Plush suffered a stroke two days before her fiftieth birthday, leaving her to celebrate in the hospital.  

On her lunch break, as a 9-1-1 dispatcher, her arm went numb and her speech became slurred. She knew she was having a stroke because she remembered reading about stroke symptoms in a pamphlet she found in a doctor’s office.

Veteran Uses Home-Based Telehealth for PTSD Treatment

By T. Crouch

Darling working on his farm in the low country of South Carolina

After serving in the Army with multiple tours abroad, Jon Darling now spends his days on his farm in the Lowcountry of South Carolina. He works with multiple organizations that connect veterans with small farms. He does it for the work, the cause, and the community.

Since his service, connecting with fellow veterans has been vital. Losing some that were close to him has been devastating.

“We kind of walk around like we don’t have problems. The one thing no one really wants to admit is ‘I need to talk to somebody before this gets out of hand,’” says Darling.

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