SC Hall of Fame

Benjamin Elijah Mays

By T. Safdi

Benjamin Elijah Mays

Benjamin Mays (1894-1984) was a minister, educator, scholar and social activist. He was known as the "Father of the Civil Rights Movement." 

Mays was born the youngest in his family and his parents were both former slaves. He grew up in Epworth, South Carolina, just a few miles from Greenwood in a time in history of rigid segregation. This became the defining period of his life and he longed to get an education. 

Maude Callen

By J. Johnson

Maude Callen

This episode is about Maude Callen (1898 -- 1990), a Nurse-Midwife, who singlehandedly brought health care to rural Pineville, S.C. and the surrounding area of Berkeley County in the early 1920s, continuing to the 1970s. The episode will tell how she delivered some 800 babies, and trained some 400 women as midwives in depressing, treacherous conditions. Many share their memories of Maude Callen and the invaluable medical service she provided as nurse and doctor to thousands in this low income area of South Carolina for generations.

Coach John McKissick

By T. Safdi

Coach John McKissick

Coach John McKissick has done something football coaches across the country only dream about. As of 2012 he became the first American football coach in history to win 600 career games. McKissick now holds the record for the most wins by a football coach on any level.

Francis Marion

By D. Adams

Francis Marion

A historical visualization of Francis Marion's partisan campaigns during the American Revolution in South Carolina featuring the artwork of Illustrator James H. Palmer, Jr., combined with interviews of historians Walter Edgar, Roy Talbert, Christine Swager, Daniel Littlefield, and Archaeologist Steve Smith.

Mary McLeod Bethune

By J. Johnson

Mary McLeod Bethune

This profile will show how Mary Jane McLeod Bethune, born to poor cotton farmers in Mayesville, SC, would brilliantly start a school of her own with just $1.50, which became an internationally recognized university. Dr. Bethune influenced important African-American Political leaders of the day, created a “Black Cabinet”, and was an advisor to several U.S. Presidents, among them, President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

The profile will also feature interviews with:

King Hagler

By M. Adams

King Hagler

“King Hagler” was the leader of the Catawba Indian Nation. He had a reputation as peacekeeper with other tribes and colonists. In 1751, Hagler signed a treaty with the Six Nations. In 1756, Catawba Indians fought alongside George Washington during the French and Indian War. King Hagler signed the Treaty of Pine Tree Hill in 1760, which provided a reservation for the Catawba.

Ernest Frederick Hollings

By S. Folks

Ernest F. Hollings

Ernest “Fritz” Hollings was born in Charleston, South Carolina in 1922. He graduated from The Citadel in 1942 and served as an artillery officer in World War Two.

After the war, he was elected to the South Carolina House of Representatives. In 1958, at age 36, he was elected Governor. In 1966, Hollings became a U.S. Senator, an office he would hold for nearly 40 years. In 2003, Hollings retired from political service.

Jasper Johns

By D. Adams

Jasper Johns

A glimpse into the life of ground-breaking artist Jasper Johns, tracing the origins of his highly stylistic work and the birth of an art movement.

John C. West

By D. Kent

John C. West

John Carl West, Sr. served as the 109th Governor of South Carolina from 1971 to 1975. From 1977 to 1981, he was the U.S. Ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

Dizzy Gillespie

By R. Taylor

Dizzy Gillespie

"From the Be to the Bop: The Musical Legacy of Dizzy Gillespie." An excerpt from South Carolina ETV's Carolina Stories.

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