SC Hall of Fame

Anne Worsham Richardson

Anne Worsham Richardson

Known as the “Charleston Bird Lady,” Anne Worsham Richardson (1919-2012), renowned wildlife artist, was sometimes dubbed the Audubon of her time. No other South Carolinian has done more to portray the avian wildlife of the Palmetto State than this Charleston artist, whose wildlife paintings hang in galleries around the world. She is South Carolina’s official painter of the State Bird, the Carolina Wren, and State Flower, Yellow Jessamine. With her husband, Richardson operated a bird sanctuary  rehabilitating injured birds at their James Island home.

Walker Gill Wylie, MD

Walker Gill Wylie, MD

Dr. Walker Gill Wylie (1848–1923) was a surgeon and civil engineer—who developed operational procedures for the nation’s hospitals, organized the first nursing school at Bellevue Hospital, New York, and introduced hydroelectric power to the Carolinas.

David Drake aka “Dave the Potter”

Dave the Potter

David Drake was an enslaved African American in Edgefield, South Carolina during the first three quarters of the nineteenth century.  He’s known today for the magnificent quality of the pots he made, the size of the pots, and he wrote poems on some of his pots—during an era when it was a crime for slaves to know how to read and write.

Ann Pamela Cunningham

Ann Pamela Cunningham

Ann Pamela Cunningham (1816-1868) was a South Carolinian from Laurens County who led the effort to restore and preserve Mount Vernon, George Washington’s ancestral home in Virginia.  She served as First Regent of the Mount Vernon Ladies’ Association of the Union.

Eliza Lucas Pinckney

Eliza Lucas Pinckney

Short biography of indigo planter and colonial entrepreneur Eliza Lucas Pinckney, another example of the enormous contribution the Pinckney family of South Carolina has made to the history of our state.

Septima Clark

Septima Clark

A pioneer in grassroots citizenship education, Septima Clark was called the ‘‘Mother of the Civil Rights Movement’’ by Martin Luther King. Clark was born in Charleston, South Carolina in 1898, daughter of a laundrywoman and a former slave. She became a teacher on Johns Island, leader of workshops at Highlander Folk School in Tennessee, and founder of “citizenship schools” throughout the South. Septima Clark, civil rights activist, developed the concept of “citizenship schools.”

Mary Boykin Chestnut

Mary Boykin Chestnut

5-minute biography of the life of American Civil War era diarist Mary Chestnut. Through the use of available archival materials, scholar interviews, and historical illustrations this program details the events surrounding Chestnut’s life and her contributions to South Carolina and American history.

Frances Ravenel Smythe Edmunds

Frances Ravenel Smythe Edmunds

Frances Ravenel Smythe Edmunds achieved national recognition as an advocate for historic preservation. She graduated from the College of Charleston in 1939. In 1947, she founded the Historic Charleston Foundation and served as Director. In 1971, she received  the Louise DuPont Crowninshield Award. President Carter appointed her to the National Advisory Council on Historic Preservation.

Maj. Gen. Charles F. Bolden, Jr.

Maj. Gen. Charles F. Bolden, Jr.

Inducted into the South Carolina Hall Of Fame, Charles Bolden, Jr. flew on four historic Space Shuttle missions in the 1980's and 90's, and became the first African-American to lead NASA as NASA Administrator.

Ronald Erwin McNair

Ronald Erwin McNair

Inducted into the South Carolina Hall Of Fame, Ronald McNair was the second African-American to go into space, and was part of the STS-51L crew that died when the Space Shuttle Challenger exploded shortly after lift-off in 1986.

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